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A cluster randomised controlled feasibility study in rural Western Kenya

Menstrual cups and sanitary pads to reduce school attrition, and sexually transmitted and reproductive tract infections


This feasibility study was conducted to determine the effect of menstrual hygiene on overall health outcomes for school-aged girls in rural western Kenya. A three arm study model was used where individuals were assigned to either use a menstrual cup, sanitary pads, or traditional materials. The study looked at school outcomes (school absenteeism and dropout risk) as well as health outcomes (STI prevalence and bacterial presence.) It was shown that those who used cups were significantly less likely to have an STI and had less bacterial growth (bacterial vaginosus.) The study indicates that menstrual cup interventions can be used effectively in order to improve health outcomes.

Language

English

Authors

Penelope A Phillips-Howard, Elizabeth Nyothach, Feiko O ter Kuile, Jackton Omoto, Duolao Wang, Clement Zeh, Clayton Onyango, Linda Mason, Kelly T Alexander, Frank O Odhiambo, Alie Eleveld, Aisha Mohammed, Anna M van Eijk, Rhiannon Tudor Edwards, John Vulule, Brian Faragher, Kayla F Laserson

Relevant locations

Kenya


Best suited for

Mhm trainer,Product distributor

Citation

Phillips-Howard PA, Nyothach E, ter Kuile FO, et al. Menstrual cups and sanitary pads to reduce school attrition, and sexually transmitted and reproductive tract infections: a cluster randomised controlled feasibility study in rural Western KenyaBMJ Open 2016;6:e013229. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2016-013229

Open acess

yes

Type of research

Quantitative,Qualitative,Randomized controlled trial

Year

2016




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